Volume 23, Issue 3 (Fall 2017)                   IJPCP 2017, 23(3): 362-379 | Back to browse issues page


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Taslimbakhsh Z, Sadeghi K, Sadeghi K, Ahmadi S M. Investigating Factor Structure, Validity, and Reliability of the Persian Version of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS: C). IJPCP. 2017; 23 (3) :362-379
URL: http://ijpcp.iums.ac.ir/article-1-2530-en.html
1- MSc. Student Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran , Email: z.taslimbakhsh@kums.ac.ir
2- PhD in Clinical Psychology, Assistant Professor Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
3- Psychiatrist, Assistant Professor Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran
4- PhD Student Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
Abstract:   (642 Views)
Objectives The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS: C) was first introduced by Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard in 1952 and then revised and completed in 1962. The given scale mainly measures behavioral compliance and suggestibility within a whole range of hypnotic phenomena (movements as well as examples of imagination and cognitive distortions) in a short time. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of SHSS: C in a non-clinical population.
Methods This descriptive study was conducted on 300 students from different schools of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in Iran selected by multi-stage cluster random sampling method and tested via research instruments such as SHSS: C, the Hypnotic Induction Profile (HIP), the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility by Spiegel, and the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI). The data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient, exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, and Guttman’s split-half coefficient using the SPSS software version 22.
Results Factor analysis using varimax rotation from the principal component analysis extraction method for the SHSS: C could lead to the extraction of three factors of hypnotic susceptibility talents of perceptive-cognitive abilities, sensory-motor phenomena, cognitive distortions, and post-hypnotic effects. The reliability coefficients (alpha, test-retest, and internal consistency) were also equal to 0.80, 0.75, and 0.74, respectively. Moreover, three types of validity (concurrent, criterion, and correlation between subscales and total scale and inter-correlations) for the HIP, the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility by Spiegel, and the NEO-FFI were reported to be 0.89, 0.84, and 0.68, respectively.
Conclusion The results showed that the SHSS: C was endowed with desirable psychometric properties in an Iranian population, and it could be used in research studies on psychology and psychiatry.
 
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Type of Study: Original Research | Subject: General
Received: 2016/06/26 | Accepted: 2017/02/25 | Published: 2017/10/1

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